Know Your Rights: Title IX

Know Your Rights: Title IX
The problem with rape or any sexual assault is that it’s a private yet public concern. Sexual assault and rape in particular is a societal issue that must be dealt with effectively to stop its perpetuation. Rape is a nightmare which refuses to go away, and it can follow you all the days of your life, unless there has been sufficient closure for the victim of the sexual abuse. We can help walk you through the trauma of the abuse, and help you to resolve the nagging problem which often takes the form of post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from a natural and a biblical perspective.

Know Your Rights: Title IX Prohibits Sexual Harassment1 and Sexual Violence Where You Go to School
1 Use of the term “sexual harassment” throughout this document includes sexual violence unless otherwise noted.
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”), 20 U.S.C. §1681 et seq., is a Federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs and activities. All public and private elementary and secondary schools, school districts, colleges, and universities (hereinafter “schools”) receiving any Federal funds must comply with Title IX. Under Title IX, discrimination on the basis of sex can include sexual harassment or sexual violence, such as rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion.
Below is additional information regarding the specific requirements of Title IX as they pertain to sexual harassment and sexual violence.
What are a school’s responsibilities to address sexual harassment and sexual violence?
• A school has a responsibility to respond promptly and effectively. If a school knows or reasonably should know about sexual harassment or sexual violence that creates a hostile environment, the school must take immediate action to eliminate the sexual harassment or sexual violence, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects.
• Even if a student or his or her parent does not want to file a complaint or does not request that the school take any action on the student’s behalf, if a school knows or reasonably should know about possible sexual harassment or sexual violence, it must promptly investigate to determine what occurred and then take appropriate steps to resolve the situation.
• A criminal investigation into allegations of sexual harassment or sexual violence does not relieve the school of its duty under Title IX to resolve complaints promptly and equitably.

If you want to learn more about your rights, or if you believe that a school district, college, or university is violating Federal law, you may contact the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, at (800) 421-3481 or ocr@ed.gov. If you wish to fill out a complaint form online, you may do so at: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/complaintintro.html.

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